Diabetes symptoms, Diagnosis, and Treatment

What is diabetes mellitus? Diabetes mellitus is a chronic, heterogeneous metabolic disease with complex pathogenesis. It’s characterized by an elevated blood glucose level, hyperglycemia due to a disturbance in insulin secretion or action, or both. It’s a chronic (long-lasting) disease affecting how the body converts food into energy. The body breaks down most foods into sugar (glucose) and releases it into the bloodstream. When blood sugar rises, the pancreas gives the signal to release insulin. Insulin acts like a key that directs blood sugar into the body’s cells to be used as energy. In this disease, the body doesn’t make enough insulin or cannot use it as well as it should. When too little insulin or the cells stop responding to insulin, too much blood sugar remains in the bloodstream. Over time, this can lead to serious health problems such as heart, vision, and kidney disease. There’s no cure for this disease yet, but losing weight, eating a healthy diet, and exercising can help. Other things you can do to help: Take medications prescribed by your endocrinologist. What are the different types of diabetes mellitus?: There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. There is also

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What are the different types of diabetes mellitus?

What is diabetes mellitus? Diabetes mellitus is a chronic, heterogeneous metabolic disease with complex pathogenesis. It’s characterized by an elevated blood glucose level or hyperglycemia due to a disturbance in insulin secretion or insulin action or both. Diabetes is a chronic (long-lasting) disease that affects how the body converts food into energy. The body breaks down most food into sugar (glucose) and releases it into the bloodstream. When blood sugar rises, the pancreas gives the signal to release insulin. Insulin acts like a key that directs blood sugar into the body’s cells so it can be used as energy. With diabetes, your body doesn’t make enough insulin or can’t use it as well as it should. When there’s too little insulin or your cells stop responding to insulin, too much blood sugar stays in your bloodstream.  Over time, this can lead to serious health problems such as heart disease, vision problems, and kidney disease. There’s no cure for diabetes yet, but losing weight, eating healthy, and exercising can help. Other things you can do to help: Take medications prescribed by your endocrinologist. Get diabetes self-management education and support from a diabetic educator. Go to your doctor’s appointments regularly, at least

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What is Plenity and How Does it Work?

Plenity: Plenity™ is an FDA-approved weight management drug. Plenity is made from naturally derived building blocks – cellulose and citric acid. It is taken 20 minutes before lunch and dinner with water to create a feeling of fullness, so you eat less and lose weight that way.  The active ingredient in Plenity is a cellulose gum, an indigestible dietary fiber. Cellulose gum has been safely used as a food additive worldwide for more than 100 years. It is found in many foods that are part of a healthy diet. Citric acid occurs naturally in citrus fruits such as oranges and lemons. Citric acid has been safely used as a food additive worldwide for years. In each plenity capsule, the two ingredients form a three-dimensional hydrogel matrix. Once the capsules reach the stomach, they break apart and release the matrix into the water.  Each hydrogel cell can hold up to 100 times its weight and grows to fill the space in the stomach and intestines. You feel full and have less room for food, so you are likely to eat less.  The hydrogel matrix in the Plenity capsule leaves the stomach and dissolves in the intestines. The cells release the absorbed

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What is Mounjaro?||Ozempic vs Mounjaro

Mounjaro Mounjaro is an injectable prescription medication containing tirzepatide, which belongs to a class of diabetes medications known as GLP-1 agonists, and GIP (glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptides). This medication is used along with diet and exercise to improve blood glucose levels in adults with type 2 diabetes mellitus. However, it is not suitable for use in patients with type 1 diabetes. Mounjaro is not a weight loss medication. However, people taking Mounjaro have lost up to 25 pounds in clinical trials. Mounjaro has compared Ozempic 1 mg in a 40-week study of 1879 adults with type 2 diabetes who were also taking metformin and had a baseline A1C of 8.3 percent. Mounjaro reduced their A1C by 2.0 percent on the 5-mg dose, 2.2 percent on the 10-mg dose, and 2.3 percent on the 15-mg dose. The A1C of people taking the Ozempic 1-mg dose was reduced by 1.9 percent on average. – On May 13, 2022, The FDA approved Mounjaro Injection, manufactured by Eli Lilly, a new once-weekly GIP, and GLP-1 receptor agonist to improve glycemic control in adults with type 2 diabetes.  Mounjaro, the first and only FDA-approved GIP and GLP-1 receptor agonist, is a single molecule that activates the

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Ozempic Injection: A Warning You Shouldn’t Ignore!

If you experience the following symptoms after taking Ozempic Injection, stop taking it and consult a doctor IMMEDIATELY:  A lump or mass in your throat,  difficulty breathing, and  difficulty swallowing. Because these may be signs & symptoms of a thyroid tumor.  if you experience  skin rashes,  hives, or  itching. Red, swollen, blistered skin. wheezing, tightness in your chest or throat, difficulty speaking, or unusual hoarseness. You should stop taking Ozempic immediately and see a doctor as these are signs of allergic reactions. If you feel,  Inability to pass urine,  change in the amount of urine, and  blood in the urine. Stop taking this injection as these are signs of kidney problems. If you feel,  Sudden pain in the right upper abdomen,  right shoulder area, or between the shoulder blades, yellow skin or eyes, or fever with chills. Very severe dizziness or fainting. Stop taking Ozempic as these may be signs of gallstones. You should also stop taking ozempic if you experience a  fast heartbeat. Vision changes. New or worse behavior or mood changes such as depression or suicidal thoughts. Severe and sometimes fatal pancreatic problems have occurred with ozempic injection. Call your doctor right away if you experience pancreatitis symptoms

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Ozempic Drug Interactions: What Medications Should Be Avoided?

I’ll list the medications that interact with Ozempic. If you’re using or plan to use Ozempic Injection as a treatment option for diabetes or weight loss, you should tell your doctor about all other medications you take daily. Below is a brief overview of the medications that may interact with Ozempic. Examples of these drugs include: insulin degludec (Tresiba) insulin detemir (Levemir) insulin glargine (Lantus, Toujeo) glimepiride (Amaryl) glipizide (Glucotrol) glyburide (Diabeta, Glynase Prestabs) Alpha-Lipoic Acid Androgens: Bortezomib: Direct-Acting Antiviral Agents (HCV) Furosemide:  Glucagon-Like Peptide-1 Agonists:  Guanethidine:  Hyperglycemia-Associated Agents: Hypoglycemia-Associated Agents: Insulins: Levothyroxine: Liraglutide:  Meglitinides:  Monoamine Oxidase Inhibitors: Prothionamide: Quinolones: Selective Serotonin Reuptake Inhibitors: Sincalide: Sulfonylureas: Thiazide and Thiazide-Like Diuretics:  Ozempic and herbs and supplements Taking certain herbs or supplements with Ozempic might increase the risk of hypoglycemia (low blood sugar levels). Examples of these include: banaba bitter melon chromium Gymnema prickly pear cactus white mulberry Maitake: Next, we’ll discuss how these drugs interact with Ozempic and cause adverse effects. To stay up to date, make sure to subscribe.

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Ozempic dosing Escalation: Why It Matters?

Ozempic Dose Escalation Ozempic (semaglutide) is a prescription drug for once-weekly injection for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. It has been shown to lower blood sugar and A1c levels and even lead to weight loss. So far, so good, right? But there’s a catch: Ozempic is also associated with several gastrointestinal side effects – nausea, vomiting, diarrhea, and abdominal pain. In clinical trials, up to 15% of patients taking the full dose had to discontinue treatment due to these side effects. This is where “dose escalation” comes into play. Dose escalation means that you start with a very low dose and increase it over time. This gives your body time to get used to the medication before you reach the full dose.The starting dose is 0.25 mg once a week as a subcutaneous injection in the abdomen, thigh, or upper arm. The recommended dose for Ozempic is 0.5 mg once weekly and may be increased to 1 mg once weekly depending on blood sugar control and tolerability.If you are using the medication for weight loss, your doctor may further increase the dose to 2 mg or 2.4 mg and slowly increase the weekly dose over a month. Why does

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How many doses and clicks in Ozempic pen?

How many doses and clicks are in one Ozempic pen? Are you curious? Let us take a look at some of the details. Ozempic is a medication used to treat diabetes and is injected under the skin in the lower stomach area. It is used along with diet and exercise to improve blood sugar control in adults with type 2 diabetes. Learn how many doses and clicks are in one Ozempic pen in this blog. Ozempic contains Semaglutide administered in a pen-like autoinjector that is available in three dosage forms.The dosage forms are listed below.Ozempic 0.25-mg pen 0.5-mg pen 1 mg pen How many doses does Ozempic 0.25 mg Pen contain? How many doses does the Ozempic 0.25 mg Pen contain? Ozempic Pen 0.25 mg contains 2 mg of semaglutide in 1.5 ml of solution. There are a total of 8 doses of 0.25 mg or 4 doses of 0.25 mg and two additional doses of 0.50 mg or 4 doses of 0.5 mg. If you use the dose of 0.25 mg for four weeks, you will be left with 4 doses of 0.25 mg. If the side effects of Ozempic Injection are severe for you, it is better to

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Ozempic – Complete Review From A Patient’s Perspective-You should know.

What is ozempic, How to Use It, Side Effects & More? Have you heard of Ozempic? Or better yet, have you tried it? Ozempic is the latest weight-loss trend in the US and it’s getting a lot of attention. Let us learn more about, What Ozempic is and how it helps with weight loss,  how to properly use an Ozempic injection,  reviews of Ozempic,  the side effects of Ozempic,  how to deal with those side effects, and what to do if you stop taking Ozempic. So, what is Ozempic? Ozempic is a prescription medication that belongs to a class of medications called GLP-1 receptor agonists. It is used along with diet and exercise to lower blood sugar levels in adults with type 2 diabetes and may reduce the risk of heart attack or stroke in adults with type 2 diabetes who have known heart disease. This injection works by helping to restore your body’s proper response to insulin. Insulin is a hormone made by the pancreas that helps your body convert sugar from food into energy. In weight loss, it helps to curb your appetite, which leads to less food intake, and your body begins to burn the extra stored

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Side Effects of ozempic, when does it start & how long does it last?

Side effects of Ozempic injection In general, the mild side effects of Ozempic are manageable or temporary as long as you take the medicine.But when you stop taking Ozempic, it may take about five weeks after your last dose for the medicine to pass out of your body. Therefore, you may experience adverse effects during this time. Let me share with you my experience with Ozempic side effects. Side effects in the first month When you take the first dose of 0.25 mg of Ozempic, you will experience nausea, constipation, loss of appetite, and indigestion. After the second dose of 0.25 mg, the side effects will start in full force and you will experience constipation, sulfur gas, bloating, and loss of appetite. Some people also experience diarrhea, so taking the dose of Ozempic on an empty stomach is better. Second month In the second month, at a dose of 0.50 mg, nausea and vomiting last only two to three days after taking it, but you will still have a loss of appetite, fatigue, constipation, and gas. Third month: In the third month, when taking 1mg dose, you will lose more weight and see weakness and fatigue; for some people, even

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